Khusugtun releases 'Jangar', it's second opus. For over a decade, it is one of the most celebrated khöömii and throat singing groups from Mongolia. Revealed by the Khöömii International Festival of Ulaanbaatar, BBC Proms, Rainforest Music Festival, Khusugtun has acquired international renown. With it's impressive khöömii soloists, it has become one of the influences of the phenomenal band The Hu.The peculiarity of this sextet lies in the use of vocal polyphony, a recent exploration in the Mongolian throat singing tradition. Their repertoire, almost entirely dedicated to khöömii (throat singing), is made up of traditional forms, such as praise songs (magtaal), short songs (bogino duu), or compositions inspired by the Mongolian music tradition.The group accompanies itself with the horse-head fiddles morin khuur, their double-bass version ikh khuur, the lute tovshuur and dombra, guitar, cello and the zither yatga. In addition, they use instruments with play on overtones, such as mouth harp in metal (tömör khuur) and bamboo (khulsan khuur), as well as the musical bow (numan khuur). This instrument has been forgotten and Khusugtun is contributing to bring it up to date.Synonymous with 'nomads', their name represents the desire to travel by music, like their ancestors who migrated across the globe. The group characterizes it's style with melodious tunes intended to purify listeners from the ambient stress of the twenty-first century. What matters to them is that people listen to their music by imagining the landscape and the beauty of nature, to free themselves from daily worries. Thanks to a peerless level of interpretation, their powerful music is full of large space that makes us feel good.
Khusugtun releases 'Jangar', it's second opus. For over a decade, it is one of the most celebrated khöömii and throat singing groups from Mongolia. Revealed by the Khöömii International Festival of Ulaanbaatar, BBC Proms, Rainforest Music Festival, Khusugtun has acquired international renown. With it's impressive khöömii soloists, it has become one of the influences of the phenomenal band The Hu.The peculiarity of this sextet lies in the use of vocal polyphony, a recent exploration in the Mongolian throat singing tradition. Their repertoire, almost entirely dedicated to khöömii (throat singing), is made up of traditional forms, such as praise songs (magtaal), short songs (bogino duu), or compositions inspired by the Mongolian music tradition.The group accompanies itself with the horse-head fiddles morin khuur, their double-bass version ikh khuur, the lute tovshuur and dombra, guitar, cello and the zither yatga. In addition, they use instruments with play on overtones, such as mouth harp in metal (tömör khuur) and bamboo (khulsan khuur), as well as the musical bow (numan khuur). This instrument has been forgotten and Khusugtun is contributing to bring it up to date.Synonymous with 'nomads', their name represents the desire to travel by music, like their ancestors who migrated across the globe. The group characterizes it's style with melodious tunes intended to purify listeners from the ambient stress of the twenty-first century. What matters to them is that people listen to their music by imagining the landscape and the beauty of nature, to free themselves from daily worries. Thanks to a peerless level of interpretation, their powerful music is full of large space that makes us feel good.
3341348603605

Details

Format: CD
Label: BUDA MUSIQUE
Rel. Date: 09/11/2020
UPC: 3341348603605

Jangar
Artist: Khusugtun
Format: CD
New: in stock 15.99
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Available Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Chinggis Khaan
2. Jangar
3. Tes gol
4. Arvan khoyor jil
5. Khoyor nutgiin erkh
6. Altain chimeg
7. Naadmyn magtaal
8. Khel khuuryn tsuurai
9. Jaran tsagaan aduu 1
10. Temee 1
11. Altain magtaal

More Info:

Khusugtun releases 'Jangar', it's second opus. For over a decade, it is one of the most celebrated khöömii and throat singing groups from Mongolia. Revealed by the Khöömii International Festival of Ulaanbaatar, BBC Proms, Rainforest Music Festival, Khusugtun has acquired international renown. With it's impressive khöömii soloists, it has become one of the influences of the phenomenal band The Hu.The peculiarity of this sextet lies in the use of vocal polyphony, a recent exploration in the Mongolian throat singing tradition. Their repertoire, almost entirely dedicated to khöömii (throat singing), is made up of traditional forms, such as praise songs (magtaal), short songs (bogino duu), or compositions inspired by the Mongolian music tradition.The group accompanies itself with the horse-head fiddles morin khuur, their double-bass version ikh khuur, the lute tovshuur and dombra, guitar, cello and the zither yatga. In addition, they use instruments with play on overtones, such as mouth harp in metal (tömör khuur) and bamboo (khulsan khuur), as well as the musical bow (numan khuur). This instrument has been forgotten and Khusugtun is contributing to bring it up to date.Synonymous with 'nomads', their name represents the desire to travel by music, like their ancestors who migrated across the globe. The group characterizes it's style with melodious tunes intended to purify listeners from the ambient stress of the twenty-first century. What matters to them is that people listen to their music by imagining the landscape and the beauty of nature, to free themselves from daily worries. Thanks to a peerless level of interpretation, their powerful music is full of large space that makes us feel good.